Yes, That Too

emitter-of-learjets:

enterprising-gentleman:

lackadaisicallexicon:

Can you imagine the YW characters playing D&D?

"Can Carmela play Eye of the Tiger on her lute every time I talk?"—Dairine, the Avenger

"Please tell me I am allowed to insult this orc on his poor…

Basically Kit is this guy?
I can’t think of the last time I held dragon vomit in my hand," Niko remarked, his voice dry. "Why, never, in fact. There are no such things as dragons. Need I also point out there are no such things as living glass dragons?
Niko, Shatterglass p. 26 (via shorm)
My family used to joke that only white people need therapy. Black people go to church instead, find remedies on their knees in prayer, sing their sorrows away. Meanwhile, white academics told me that African-Americans merely fabricated ungrounded stigma around psychiatric help. As absurd as these two viewpoints may sound, these myths actually point to a greater phenomenon.

As of 2012, 15% of the US American population without health insurance was African-American. Considering the role economic status plays in healthcare sheds light on the racial discrepancy with respect to treating mental illness. Many people with health insurance find that their companies don’t cover the cost of mental illness treatment, and those without any health insurance find themselves facing incredibly high prices to pay for medical care, or opting not to pursue treatment at all. These obstacles often lead Black folks in the states to “rely on family, religious and social communities for emotional support rather than turning to health care professionals, even though this may at times be necessary,” states NAMI’s fact sheet on African American Community Mental Health.

Even if able to pay for treatment, many Black folks encounter prejudices and biases from medical caregivers. Black people, especially Black men, are frequently misdiagnosed when it comes to mental illness. For example, most prominently in the 1960s, white doctors institutionalized Black men involved in civil rights protests (particularly in Detroit) on the grounds that the behaviors these men defended as political activism was really schizophrenic rage and volatility. Also, medical practitioners’ prescriptions sometimes reflect discriminatory and generally racial assumptions that Black people do not need as much medicine as white people. Studies conducted by the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health discovered that Black US Americans are 1.5 times as likely to be denied antidepressant treatment. No one wants tell you that the system is sick. No one wants to tell you that the healthcare system intentionally keeps historically marginalized groups like queer folks, and Black folks, and people who happen to find themselves at the intersection of queerness and Blackness sick.

To Be Queer, Black, and “Sick” | Autostraddle (via brutereason)

This is not a feel good article, but it NEEDS to be said. This is a huge problem, and part of the reason that I will never shame anyone for having self-diagnosed.

(via depressionresource)

My family used to joke that only white people need therapy. Black people go to church instead, find remedies on their knees in prayer, sing their sorrows away. Meanwhile, white academics told me that African-Americans merely fabricated ungrounded stigma around psychiatric help. As absurd as these two viewpoints may sound, these myths actually point to a greater phenomenon.

As of 2012, 15% of the US American population without health insurance was African-American. Considering the role economic status plays in healthcare sheds light on the racial discrepancy with respect to treating mental illness. Many people with health insurance find that their companies don’t cover the cost of mental illness treatment, and those without any health insurance find themselves facing incredibly high prices to pay for medical care, or opting not to pursue treatment at all. These obstacles often lead Black folks in the states to “rely on family, religious and social communities for emotional support rather than turning to health care professionals, even though this may at times be necessary,” states NAMI’s fact sheet on African American Community Mental Health.

Even if able to pay for treatment, many Black folks encounter prejudices and biases from medical caregivers. Black people, especially Black men, are frequently misdiagnosed when it comes to mental illness. For example, most prominently in the 1960s, white doctors institutionalized Black men involved in civil rights protests (particularly in Detroit) on the grounds that the behaviors these men defended as political activism was really schizophrenic rage and volatility. Also, medical practitioners’ prescriptions sometimes reflect discriminatory and generally racial assumptions that Black people do not need as much medicine as white people. Studies conducted by the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health discovered that Black US Americans are 1.5 times as likely to be denied antidepressant treatment. No one wants tell you that the system is sick. No one wants to tell you that the healthcare system intentionally keeps historically marginalized groups like queer folks, and Black folks, and people who happen to find themselves at the intersection of queerness and Blackness sick.

To Be Queer, Black, and “Sick” | Autostraddle (via brutereason)

This is not a feel good article, but it NEEDS to be said. This is a huge problem, and part of the reason that I will never shame anyone for having self-diagnosed.

(via depressionresource)

I stayed with it because I was writing what I wanted to read: girls kicking butt, mainly. That’s a requirement. In my books, boys can kick butt too—and even adults if they behave themselves. But for years and years we’ve been so brainwashed into thinking that males and females have two different roles, and I think we’re all going to be a lot happier in our lives if we start looking at the things we have in common. I try to show this through my books, and a story about a girl in a man’s field is still one of the clearest contrasts you can present as a writer.
Tamora Pierce, author of the Circle of Magic quartet, the Circle Opens quartet, the Daughter of the Lioness duo, the Immortals quartet, the Protector of the Small quartet, and the Song of the Lioness quartet, on her themes. (via theticklishpear)

macabrefascination:

featheredfriend:

charminglyantiquated:

silly silly little comic

Ladies, gentlemen, and other gentlepeople: my girlfriend’s ‘silly little comic’

Oh my fucking gods this is perfect

"I never thought goodness could be so tough," [Nita] said. "So strong. But then again, I guess goodness isn’t something I’d think about a whole lot, anyway. Nobody uses the word much unless it’s in a commercial, and then they’re just trying to convince you that something has a lot of milk in it."

Carl nodded, looking wry. “Virtue,” he said. “The real thing. It’s not some kind of cuddly teddy bear you can keep on the shelf until you need a hug. It’s dangerous, which is why it makes people so nervous. Virtue has its own agenda, and believe me, it’s not always yours. The word itself means strength, power. And when it gets loose, you’d better watch out.”

"Something bad might happen?"

"Impossible. But possibly something painful."

A Wizard Alone (NME), by Diane Duane (via dorotheian)

nombinary:

dumpyspaceprincess:

I’m not saying Carlos is perfect dorky enough to have his wheelchair painted up like a Jurassic Park jeep, but…he totally is. 

OMG sorry if this is all wrong but wheelchairs and science are two things I’m VERY unfamiliar with!

UM AMAZING

Kel settled on the bench and placed her hands face-up in her lap, pressing thumbs and forefingers to show wholeness and emptiness, as the Yamani armsmistress had taught her. Yamani warriors meditated with broken limbs, in sleet and snow, even as their wounds got stitched up. I can do this, she thought. She let her thoughts and fears stream away from the still pond that was her image of herself as she wanted to be.

That pond showed her a man, stubborn, harsh, old, who spent the night in discomfort. He did not do it for the squire who kept vigil there, but for the sake of duty, and for the web of custom and law that was the realm.

The realm. In her time as a squire she had seen more of it than most people knew existed, from the damp and mossy streets of Pearlmouth to Northwatch Fortress. She had hunted pirates in the west, built up dams against floods in the east. Mountains, green valleys, desert— she had ridden or walked in them all, measuring them with blisters and grit. Was this what was meant by “the realm”? Or was it other things: a little girl with a muddy doll, Burchard of Stone Mountain livid with grief and rage, a king who admitted a law was wrong, Lalasa in her bustling shop with pins in her mouth. If they were the realm, then so were griffins, sparrows, dogs ugly and beautiful, Stormwings, foul- and sweet-tempered horses, spidrens.

If she owed duty to the realm, then it was not the dry, withered thing it sounded in people’s mouths. Duty was what was owed, good parts and bad, to keep the realm growing, to keep it as fair as life could be kept. Duty was an old man, snug in his fur-lined robe, snoring lightly somewhere behind her.
Keladry of Mindelan’s ordeal meditation, Squire, Tamora Pierce. (via mustangscullaaay)

allies-person:

lurknomoar:

In the original books, Hermione was a clever, kick-ass character made highly relatable by her imperfections. The movies erased most of her flaws, making her a better ‘role model for girls’, but a far less interesting person: a typical weakly written strong woman. So here are a few things we should…

YES, thank you.

I mean I actually do headcanon her as autistic because also that kind of terror makes so much more sense if you’d been getting the message of not good enough, never good enough, can’t belong for your whole life. [Why would she already be terrified of not being good enough before the discrimination starts unless she’d already experienced it for something else?]